Creation of Utilitarian Sculptures Derived From Fish Forms : Current School News

Creation of Utilitarian Sculptures Derived From Fish Forms

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Creation of Utilitarian Sculptures Derived From Fish Forms.

ABSTRACT  

This study “Creation of Utilitarian Sculptures derived from Fish Forms” is an expression of ideas generated from nature – guppy and tilapia fish, to support the making of sculptures that possess utilitarian value.

Guppies are small active freshwater topminnows mostly kept in aquariums while tilapias are members of the Cichlidae family, with squat body shape commonly known as finfishes.

The objectives of this research are to (a) produce sculptures inspired by the guppy fish form (b) execute functional sculptures using tilapia as inspiration (c) explore the movement of fish in utilitarian sculpture (d) create abstract utilitarian sculptures using the fish.

The framework of this research is based on Andrzej projection that a careful study and analysis of the anatomy of every subject enable the recreation of the subtlest tensions of musculature and movement, and to articulate a vision with high levels of accuracy.

Functional art refers to aesthetic objects that serve utilitarian purposes. In this research, the word „utilitarian‟ and functional‟ is used interchangeably.

Muscato maintains that in Mesopotamian art, animals appear both with humans and alone, indicating their prominence in ancient culture. Animals were respected for their strength, speed, or ferocity and appear in art as representations of those ideas.

The study was done in the studio via the Practice-Based method. It involved modeling and casting, welding, and wood carving. From primary and secondary sources, sketches of the guppy and tilapia fish were produced to understand their features and movement, especially in water.

TABLE OF CONTENT

DECLARATION ………………. iii
CERTIFICATION ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. iv
DEDICATION………………………………………………………………………………………………………… v
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS………………………………………………………………………………………. vi
ABSTRACT ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….vii
TABLE OF CONTENT …………………………………………………………………………………………… ix
LIST OF FIGURES ……………………………………………………………………………………………….xiv
LIST OF PLATES …………………………………………………………………………………………………xiv
1.1 Introduction/Background to the Study……………………………………………………………………..1
1.2 Statement of the Problem………………………………………………………………………………………4
1.3 Aim and Objectives of the Study ……………………………………………………………………………4
1.4 Research Questions ……………………………………………………………………………………………..5
1.5 Justification of the Study ………………………………………………………………………………………5
1.6 Significance of the Study………………………………………………………………………………………5
1.7 Scope and Delimitation of the Study……………………………………………………………………….6
1.8 Conceptual Framework…………………………………………………………………………………………6

CHAPTER TWO ……………………………………………………………………………………………………..7
LITERATURE REVIEW…………………………………………………………………………………………..7
2.1 Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………..7
2.2 General Review…………………………………………………………………………………………………..7
2.3 Review of Related Works……………………………………………………………………………………..9
2.4 Cobalt Blue Glass Fish Sculpture (Unknown Artist, unknown year)……………………………..9
2.5 Steampunk Fish Sculpture by Edouard Martinet (2009) …………………………………………… 10
2.6 Contemporary „Angel‟ Stool (Unknown artist, 2016)………………………………………………. 11
2.7 The Octopus Chair by Maximo Riera (2012) …………………………………………………………. 12
2.8 Prestige Stool: Caryatid by Buli Master (1810 – 1870)…………………………………………….. 13
2.9 Legs Table by Alida Walsh (1933 – 2006)…………………………………………………………….. 14
2.10 Butterfly Chair by Eduardo Garcia Campos (2013)……………………………………………….. 15
2.11 Table Ash by Tihomir Velichkov (1999)……………………………………………………………… 16
2.12 Vintage Ashanti Stool (Unknown Artist, 1950 – 1960). …………………………………………. 17
2.13 Bronze Fish Sculpture by Willy Kreitz ……………………………………………………………….. 18
2.14 Copper Fish Sculpture by Alanna Baird ………………………………………………………………. 19
2.15 Conclusion …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 19

CHAPTER THREE………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21
METHODOLOGY…………………………………………………………………………………………………. 21
3.1 Introduction……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 21
3.2 Instruments for Data Collection …………………………………………………………………………… 22
3.3 Tools for Data Collection …………………………………………………………………………………… 22
3.4 Data Collection ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23
3.5 Data Analysis…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 23
3.6 Procedure and Processes…………………………………………………………………………………….. 23
3.7.1 Images of Guppies………………………………………………………………………………………….. 24
3.7.2 Images of Tilapia……………………………………………………………………………………………. 25
3.7.3 Sketches of Representational Stage……………………………………………………………………. 26
3.7.4 Sketches of Stylized Stage ……………………………………………………………………………….. 28
3.7.5 Sketches of Abstract Stage……………………………………………………………………………….. 29
3.8 Preliminary Studio Exploration……………………………………………………………………………. 32
3.8.1 Step One: Preparation of Armature ……………………………………………………………………. 32
3.8.2 Modeling in Clay……………………………………………………………………………………………. 33
3.8.3 Taking the Moulds………………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
3.8.4 Charging the Mould:……………………………………………………………………………………….. 34
3.8.5 Coupling the Work …………………………………………………………………………………………. 35

CHAPTER FOUR………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 37
CATALOGUE AND ANALYSIS OF WORKS ………………………………………………………….. 37
4.1 Categories of the Works …………………………………………………………………………………….. 37
4.2 Green Tail ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 37
4.3 Mayday…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 38
4.4 Twin Towers……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 39
4.5 Home, Sweet Home…………………………………………………………………………………………… 40
4.6 Hunger Strike…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 41
4.7Sports………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 42
4.8 Fellowship……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 43
4.9 Return …………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 44
4.10 Camouflage……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 45
4.11 Pregnancy ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 46
4.12 Night Vision…………………………………………………………………………………………………… 47
4.13 Small Talk……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 48

CHAPTER FIVE …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 50
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION…………………………………………………………………………… 50
5.1 Summary…………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 50
5.2 Findings………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 50
5.3 Recommendation………………………………………………………………………………………………. 51
5.4 Contribution to Knowledge ………………………………………………………………………………… 52
References ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. 53

INTRODUCTION 

Fish have been a subject in art for at least 14,000 years and appeared in primitive art from many cultures. In the ancient civilization of the West, fishes were a constant motif. Fish designs in ancient Egypt were common and showed little change for 1500 years. Decorative fish designs of the Greeks and Romans (often with mythological significance) were adopted by early Christians as religious symbols. With the development of art, the non – religious depiction of fish became more widespread so did the realistic paintings of fish that appear during the Renaissance.

This tradition reached a peak in the 17th century Netherlands. After 1750, fish images appeared in many different contexts. Over the years, artists have used animal forms, and the inspiration from animals to produce art in several ways. Animals occupied an important place in medieval art and thought. Artists readily employed animal motifs, as part of their decorative vocabulary (Moyle, 1991). Generally, the animal form is a subject that has and is still largely explored in different concepts, aspects, and techniques. 

Bozimo, (2012) states that the endless resource in nature is inevitably expressed in virtually every artistic endeavor; be it music, literature, performance, sculpture, painting among others, and the multidimensional functions of art give it essence to be used in the daily activities of individuals. Nigerian artists like Sunday Chukwumeremeze and Adeola Balogun have used animal forms in different concepts. Isaac (2000) studied animal forms in relief sculpture in his Master of Fine Art Research at Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria titled: Development of form: A Study of Animals in Relief Sculpture, while Santas (2016) explored the charging cock form in sculpture. 

REFERENCES

Abba Y. A. (2013) Water Quality Management in Fish Culture, Fisheries Series,
National Agricultural Extension and Research Liaison Services, No. 3 Ahmadu
Bello University, Zaria, 9
Adams J. (2009) Steampunk Fish of Edouard Martinet, The Reef Builders, Retrieved
from http://reefandmarineaquariumblog.htm, July 13, 2016
Allenchey A. (2013) What is Functional Art? Retrieved from www.artspace.com
December 15, 2015
Andrzej S. (2014) Saatchi art.htm, London Bow, United Kingdom, Retrieved from
http://www.andrzej Szymczyk _ Saatchi Art.htm November 22, 2015
Anonymous (2015) Fancy Guppies, Retrieved from http://www.tropical-fish
keeping.com July 11, 2016
Anonymous (2016) Functional Sculpture Retrieved from addinterior.htm July 30, 2016
Anonymous (2016) Fish Sculpture Retrieved from http://www.artofglass.com July 30,
2016
Anonymous (2013) How to Sex Tilapia Retrieved from www.tilapia-farming.com
October 11, 2017
Anonymous (2016) Why does the Ocean appear Blue Retrieved from
http://scientificamerica.com September 17, 2016
Arrignon J. C. V. (1998) Tilapia, the Tropical Agriculturalist, MacMillan Education
LTD, London, 11, 13&14
Archer. (1995) The Nature of Research, Retrieved from http://www.books.aisc.ucla.edu
on September 13, 2016
Baird A. (2015) Art & Music/ Artwork/Statues & Sculptures, Retrieved from
www.custommade.com October 21, 2017
Bale O. O. (2014) Exploring the Guitar Form for the Production of Sculpture,
Unpublished MFA Dissertation, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria
Bolorunduro P. I. (2013) Tilapia, Fish Culture in Ponds, Fisheries Series No 4, National
Agricultural Extension and Research Liaison Services, Ahmadu Bello University,
Zaria, 4,8&9
Boulenger E. G. (Unknown Year) Keep an Aquarium, Ward, Lock & Co., Limited,
London and Melbourne.

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