ADS! Get Admission into 200 Level and Study any Course in any University of Your Choice. Low Fees | No JAMB UTME. Call 08063692710

Lecturers’ Competencies and the Effective Teaching of Computer Science Courses (PDF))

=>> CHAT Right HERE with Our Representative - Immediate Response


Lecturers’ Competencies and the Effective Teaching of Computer Science Courses

Abstract

The computer science discipline is evolving with problems in both technological and pedagogical aspects almost worldwide.

With the advent of new technologies and approaches for teaching programming at all ages, many countries including Turkey have revised their computer science curriculum.

These revisions have resulted in serious training needs being highlighted for teachers with inadequate competencies to meet the expected learning outcomes.

Hence, the purpose of this study was to explore; (a) the self-perceived competencies of teachers about the topics in the curriculum, (b) perceptions about programming, programming tools and approaches, and (c) contribution of university education to their teaching profession.

The findings revealed that most teachers believe they are not sufficiently competent to be an effective computer science teacher.

Related to this finding, most of them especially mentioned their training needs for programming, emerging tools and technologies.

Plus more than half of the participants think that the higher education curriculum is inadequate to meet teacher expectations and to create competent teachers.

INTRODUCTION

1.1   Background of the Study

Effective teaching of Computer Science courses requires certain competencies. Generally, all people employed as lecturers need to develop the competencies and skills which will enable them to deliver on their job effectively.

There is also the need for lecturers engaged in the teaching of Computer Science courses to maximize the use of teaching resource to enhance students learning and to prepare them to cope up with life in today’s society in which life style, attitudes and skills are challenging on a daily basis as a result of technology.

The term competency has been defined in different ways by several authors. Hornby (2000) defined competency as the ability to do something well in a particular job or for a particular task.

For Ozioko, Ezeani and Omeje (2009), it is the required skills possessed by some people or those expected to be possessed by them in the discharge of their professional duties.

Competencies in the views of Vathanophas and Thai-ngamare (2007) are the characteristics or abilities of an individual that enable him to perform appropriate specific actions.

It represents the capability that an individual brings to the job and when the responsibilities of the job to produce the desired results require the demonstration of specific actions, the individual draws from inner resources for the capability to respond.

As noted by Ezeugbor (2008), lecturers’ teaching competencies embrace skills, standards, methods and capabilities required when engaged in the teaching and learning process.

According to Ocholla (2003), there are competencies that will make Computer Science courses lecturers to be very effective in the discharge of their teaching duties.

These competencies include competency in classroom management, competency in planning of practical lessons, competency in improvisation of instructional materials, competency in teaching methods and competency in lesson presentation.

Classroom management refers to the ability of a teacher to create a good learning environment that engages all the learners effectively while teaching is on.

It involves how a teacher manages or ensures physical convenience to determine the level of students’ participation in lesson.

When the classroom environment is conducive, students seem to put on positive attitude towards that particular subject, but if the learning environment is not conducive there could be negative reactions by the students.

A well-organized class with a subservient learning environment portrays the background of the teacher concerned. That is why Anderson (2001) maintained that the achievement of students relates to the classroom climate and learning environments.

There are different levels of classroom management competencies that lecturers should possess in order to create an effective teaching.

The teacher is expected not only to impart knowledge but to foster the adjustment of students, understand students’ basic cognitive and social problems, match curricular offerings to levels of mental development, make curricular specifications relevant; and provides a smooth transition from home to school and from one level of education to another.

Lecturers who create warm and accepting yet professional atmospheres by improvisation of good instructional materials will promote persistent effort and favourable attitudes toward teaching and learning.

This strategy is successful in children and adults. Interesting visual aids, such as booklets, posters, or practice equipment, motivate learners by capturing their attention and curiosity (Lepper, 2008).

In the same way, strong and lasting memory is connected with the emotional state and experience of the learner. People remember better when learning is accompanied by strong emotions.

When a teacher makes something funny, exciting, happy, loving, or perhaps even a bit frightening, students learn more readily and the learning lasts much longer.

Improvisation is the ability of the lecturer to create an alternative instructional material where the original of it cannot be easily assessed.

The lecturer is expected to possess competency in using various teaching methods. Methodology refers to the process of teaching and learning which brings the learner into relationship with the skills and knowledge that are specified and contained within the curriculum.

According to Gutek (2008), methods are the means or procedures that a teacher uses to aid students in having an experience, mastering a skill or process, or acquiring knowledge.

If efficient and effective, methods of instruction will achieve the desired end because teaching implies the use of a technique or method of instruction to secure a desired objective.

Educators at all levels of instruction are involved in methodological issues because through methods lecturers acquire the competencies needed to carry out instructional processes effectively.

Lesson presentation here refers to manners in which the lecturer impacts the learners with what he intends to teach. Competency in lesson presentation is as crucial as the mastery of courses matter itself.

The factors that make lecturers apply the most effective lesson presentation strategies to achieve teaching objectives are critical aspects of effective teaching.

Teaching is viewed sociologically as a social action because lecturers in the classroom interact with their pupils in such a way as to attain specific pre-determined goals.

The performance of this action by the teacher is affected by the quality of the lecturers’ lesson presentation competencies.

The role socialization of the teacher involves the training which the teacher received before engaging in the act of teaching.

As a result teaching can be seen as a diverse and complex activity because the goal of any teaching task is achievement of instructional objectives through effective lesson presentation.

Due to the rapid development of digital technologies in the emerging information society, today’s workforce requires individuals to be able to employ a variety of cognitive skills in order to solve problems in digital environments.

As a consequence, the digital revolution and the increasing digitalization of school life over the past decades have created a need for digitally competent lecturers who can teach Computer Science courses in an adequate manner.

The increasing focus on skills, attitudes, and competencies such as teaching and digital competencies is reflected in most educational reforms, policies, and frameworks (Ferrari, 2013).

However, studies indicate that among lecturers and students there seems to be a gap between technical knowledge and knowledge of the application of technology in learning context (Haugerud, 2011).

Krumsvik (2014) underlined the positive effects lecturers’ competence may have on students’ knowledge, computer skills, abilities, and general understanding of courses.

The need for effective teaching of Computer Science courses in Nigerian higher educational institutions cannot be over-emphasised in the today’s technology-driven society.

In order to develop digital competence in students, the lecturers must possess the necessary competencies so as to be effective in their teaching.

However, research still depicts an overall lack of competencies among lecturers in the teaching of Computer Science and Computer Science related courses (Tomte, 2013).

This does not augur well for the students they teach. It is a known fact that a teacher’s way of thinking and beliefs guide his or her behavior and decisions inside and outside the classroom.

The challenge for lecturers in the universities is enormous. Besides having to master their various courses, they must possess competencies over a wide range of teaching methods and strategies and understanding of the learning processes of students.

Based on the above background, the study is carried out to determine the relationship between lecturers’ competencies and effective teaching of Computer Science courses in state universities in South Nigeria.

References

Ahamibe, C. (2009). “Aims and Objectives of Education” In B. O. Ukuje (Ed) Foundation of Education. Benin City; Ethiope Publishing Corporation, pp. 26–27.

Akuegwu, B. A., Udida, L. A., and Ntukidem, E. P. (2011). Nigerian graduating students access to e-learning technology. Implications for higher education management. Business Education Journal, 6(2), 120-128.

Alaxander, R. (2012). Policy and Practice in Primary Education. London: Routledege.

Alberto, P.A., and Troutman, A.C. (1995). Applied behavior analysis for teachers (4th Ed.). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill/Prentice-Hall.

Allen, E. A. (1999). Attitude to school and teachers in a secondary modern school, unpublished M. A. Thesis. University of London.

Amalaha, B. M. (2009). The Teacher in the Classroom. In Ukeje, B. O. (Ed) Foundations of Education. Benin-City: Ethiope Publishing.

Amalaha, B. M. (2009). The Teacher in the Classroom. In Ukeje, B. O. (Ed) Foundations of Education. Benin-City: Ethiope Publishing.

Amininik, S, Amami. S, Jalalpour. S, Azodi. P. (2000). Survey of relation between lesson plan qualities with student views about Bushehr University of Medical Sciences faculty members. The Journal of Medical School, fourth national conference on medical education Tehran Iran, 2000:84.

Ashcroft, L. (2004). Developing Competencies, Critical Analysis and Personal Transferable Skills

Baker, P. H. (2005). Managing Student Behaviour: How ready are teachers to meet the challenge? American Secondary Education.

Baumert, J., Kunter, M., Blum, W., Klusmann, U., Krauss, S.,and Neubrand , M. (2013). Cognitive Activation in the Mathematics Classroom and Professional Competence of Teachers: A Research Program. NY: Springer.

Beare, S. and Hinde, R. (2001) “Cost effective management of animal and plant disease incursions”, ABARE Conference Paper 2001.8 (AARES, Adelaide), ABARE, Canberra.

Black, P., and Wiliam, D. (1998). Inside the Black Box: Raising Standards Through Classroom Assessment. Phi Delta Kappan, 80(2), 139–144.

Brown, J. W., Lewis, R. B. and Harcleroad, F. F. (2009). A-V Instruction Materials and Methods. New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Bruner, J. (1964). Toward a Theory of Instruction. Cambridge MA Harvard University Press.

Clark, C. M., and Peterson, P. (1984). Teachers’ thought processes. Occasional paper No. 72. The Institute for Research on Teaching, Michigan State University.

Clark, L. M. (2009) Teaching tools teaching in the secondary school new York: Macmillan publishing co. Inc

Colman, J. F. (2007). The Master Teachers and the Art of Teaching. New York. Pitman Publishing.

Coppola, A.J., Scricca, D.B., Conners, G.E. (2004). Supportive supervision: Becoming a teacher of teachers. CA, Thousand Oaks: Corwi press.

Corno, L. (2008). On teaching adaptively. Educational Psychologist, 43(3), 161–173.

Creemers, B. P. M. (2014). The Effective Classroom. London: Caseell. Fafunwa, A. B. (1991). History of Education in Nigeria. Ibadan: NPS Educational Publishers.

Creemers, B. P. M. (2014). The Effective Classroom. London: Caseell. Fafunwa, A. B. (1991). History of Education in Nigeria. Ibadan: NPS Educational Publishers.

Dass, P. M. (2008, April). Professional development of science teachers: results of using the Iowa Chautauqua model in Collier County, Florida. Paper presented at the National Association for Research in Science Teaching Annual Conference, San Diego, Calif., USA.

Dolan, L., Turkkan, J., Werthamer-Larsson, L., and Kellam, S. G. (1989). The good behavior game training  anual. Baltimore, MD: Johns Hopkins Prevention Research Center.

Dorph, G. Z. (1997). Beyond prepared materials: Fostering teacher learning in the service of children’s learning. Religious Education, 92(4), 459–478.

Eastwood Paideia School (2004). Three Modes of Learning/Teaching. <http://eastwood. cps-k12.org/home.html>

Eggen, P. and Kauchak, D. (2001). Educational psychology: Windows on classrooms. New Jersey Prentice Hall Inc.

Emmer, E. T. and Stough, L. M. (2001). Classroom Management: A Critical Part of Educational Psychology, with implications for teacher education. Educational Psychologist. 

Ezeani, C. (2003). The Relevance of Library Science Education in Nigerian Universities to the World of Work. Research Report Submitted to Association of African Universities, Accra, Ghana. P.7

Ezeugbor, C. (2008), Information and Communication Technology (ICT) competence level of Nigerian tertiary institution teachers as a Challenge to harnessing the ICT gains in Education. Proceeding of the first International Conference of the Faculty of Education. University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

Ezewu, E. (2003). Sociology of Education. Lagos: Londman Group.

Ezewu, E. E. (2003). Sociology of Education. Lagos: Longman Company.

Faraday S, Overton C and Cooper S (2011). Effective Teaching and Learning in Vocational Education, LSN London, UK.

Faraday S, Overton C and Cooper S (2011). Effective Teaching and Learning in Vocational Education, LSN London, UK.

Ferrari, A. (2013). DIGCOMP: A Framework for Developing and Understanding Digital Competence in Europe. In Y. Punie and B. N. Breco (Eds.), JRC Scientific and Policy Reports (pp. 50). Seville: European Commission Joint Research Centre. Institute for Prospective Technological Studies.

Flanders, N. A. (2004). Analysis teacher behaviour. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.Kratz, H. E. (2006). Characteristic of a leader as recognized by children Pedagogy. Seminar 3.

Flanders, N. A. (2004). Analysis teacher behaviour. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.Kratz, H. E. (2006). Characteristic of a leader as recognized by children Pedagogy. Seminar 3.

Flanders, N. A. (2004). Analysis teacher behaviour. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.Kratz, H. E. (2006). Characteristic of a leader as recognized by children Pedagogy. Seminar 3.

Freiberg, J. and Freebody, P. (2005). Analysing Literacy Events in Classrooms and Homes: Conversation-Analytic Approaches. In Freebody, P., Ludwig, C. and Gunn, S. (Eds), Everyday Literacy Practices in and Out of Schools in Low Socio-Economic Urban Communities.

Freiberg, J. and Freebody, P. (2005). Analysing Literacy Events in Classrooms and Homes: Conversation-Analytic Approaches. In Freebody, P., Ludwig, C. and Gunn, S. (Eds), Everyday Literacy Practices in and Out of Schools in Low Socio-Economic Urban Communities.

Gbamanja P. T. (2008). Essentials of Curriculum and Instruction. Theory and Practice. Port Harcourt: Pam Unique Publishing Company.

Gbamanja P. T. (2008). Essentials of Curriculum and Instruction. Theory and Practice. Port Harcourt: Pam Unique Publishing Company.

Gbamanja P. T. (2009). Essentials of Curriculum and Instruction. Theory and Practice. Port Harcourt: Pam Unique Publishing Company.

Gbamanja P. T. (2009). Essentials of Curriculum and Instruction. Theory and Practice. Port Harcourt: Pam Unique Publishing Company.

Guloba, M.  Wokodola J. and Bategeka (2010). Does Teaching Methods and Availability of Resources Influence Pupils’ Performance, (Unpublished Research) in Uganda.

Guloba, M.  Wokodola J. and Bategeka (2010). Does Teaching Methods and Availability of Resources Influence Pupils’ Performance, (Unpublished Research) in Uganda.

Guloba, M.  Wokodola J. and Bategeka (2010). Does Teaching Methods and Availability of Resources Influence Pupils’ Performance, (Unpublished Research) in Uganda.

Guloba, M.  Wokodola J. and Bategeka (2010). Does Teaching Methods and Availability of Resources Influence Pupils’ Performance, (Unpublished Research) in Uganda.

Gutek and Laurie Larwood. (2008). Newbury, Park, Calif.: Sage Publications, 129-156.

Haas M.S (2002). The Influence of Teaching Methods on Student Achievement, Unpublished Research, Dissertation Submitted to the Faculty of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and University.

Haugerud, T. (2011). Student Teachers Learning to Teach: The Mastery and Appropriation of Digital Technology. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 6(4), 226–239.

Hegarty, S. (2000). Teaching as a knowledge-based activity, Oxford review of education, Sep2000, Vol. 26 Issue ¾, p 451, 15p, 4 diagrams.

Hornby, A. (2000).Oxford Advanced Learners Dictionary (5th Ed.) Oxford University Press, Oxford.

Ingersoll, R. M.  and Smith, R. J. (2003). Out of field teaching and the limits of teachers’ policy: A research report. Washington DC: Center for the Study of Teaching and Police, University of Washington.

Jalongo, M. R., Rieg, S.A., and Helterbran, V. R. ( 2007). PLANNING for LEARNING: Collaborative Approaches to Lesson Design and Review. NY:Teachers College, Columbia University.

Joof, G. W., Mezieobi, K. A. and Amadi, H. C. (2004). Teaching the convert of social studies. In G. W. Joof and H. C. Amadi (Eds.) Social Studies in Schools: Teaching Method Techniques, approaches and perspectives. Onitsha: Oatrite Publishers.

Kombo, K. D. and Tromp, A. L. D. (2006). Proposal and Thesis Writing: An introduction, Nairobi: Pauline Publications Africa.

Larson, D. and Varangis, P. (2001) “Managing risks rather than markets: An institutional view from the World Bank of agricultural risk management”, In Resource Management in Asia Pacific Developing Countries, A volume in honor of Professor Ronald C. Duncan, National Centre for Development Studies and Director, Asia Pacific School of Economics and Management, University House, Australian National – University, Canberra, mimeo while in press, (Conference 30-31 July 2001).

Musgrove F. and Taylor, P. H. (2003). Society and the teacher’s role. New York: Routledege and Regal Paul.

Piller Bonne and Skilling M. 50 (2000). English Language Teaching Strategies used (unpublished research).

Kagan, D. M., and Tippins, D. J. (1992). The evolution of functional lesson plans among twelve elementary and secondary student teachers. The Elementary School Journal, 92(4), 477–489.

Kimweri P. (2004). Adult Teaching Learning, The Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam Tanzania.

Kombo, K. D. and Tromp, A. L. D. (2006). Proposal and Thesis Writing: An introduction, Nairobi: Pauline Publications Africa.

Krumsvik, R. J. (2014). Teacher educators’ digital competence. Scandinavian Journal of Educational Research, 58(3), 269–280.

Krumsvik, R. J., Egelandsdal, K., Sarastuen, N. K., Jones, L. Ø., and Eikeland, O. J. (2013). Sammenhengen mellom IKT-bruk og læringsutbytte (SMIL) i videregående opplæring (F. D. Læringsfelleskap, Trans.). Bergen: Universitetet i Bergen.

Lepper, M. R. (2008). Motivational Considerations in the Study of Instruction. Cognition and Instruction Vol. 5, 4. pp.289–309.

Lloyd, J. P. (2008). Handbook on Agricultural Education in Public Schools, Illinois; The Interstate Printers and Publishers Inc.

McKeachie, W.J. (2000). Teaching tips: A guidebook for the beginning college teacher. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company.

McKeachie, W.J. (2000). Teaching tips: A guidebook for the beginning college teacher. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company.

Mikis, M. (2004). Challenges in the Usage and Teaching of ICT in schools http://www.google.com/ search? Date accessed 20/3/2009.

Monk, D. H. (2008). Courses matter preparation of secondary mathematics and science teachers and student achievement. Economics of Education Review, 13(2), 125-145.

Motimore, P. et al. (2002). School Matters: The Junior Years. London: Paul Chapman Publishing Ltd.

Musgrove F. and Taylor, P. H. (2003). Society and the teacher’s role. New York: Routledege and Regal Paul.

Ndirangu C (2007). Teaching methodology, African Virtual University 1 Published under Africana.

Ocholla, D. (2003). An Overview of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the LIS Schools of Eastern and Southern Africa. Journal of Education for Information. 21 (2-3): 181-194.

http://www.emeraldinsight.com/insight/viewcontentitem.do?contenttype=ArticleandhdAction=inkpdfandcontentid=1746806 Date accessed 5/5/09.

Okon, C. P. (1999). Teacher effectiveness as related to students’ achievement in social studies in JSS in Uyo Urban. Unpublished M.Ed. Thesis, University of Calabar.

Olakulehin, F. (2007). Information and Communication Technology in Teacher Training and Professional Development in Nigeria. Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education, 8 (1):133-142.

Olugbemiro, J. (2000). TEACHERS—Training of—China—Hong Kong; PERCEPTION — Testing; EXPERTISE Educational Research, Vol. 42 Issue 3, pp. 287–309, 22p,

Orji J. D. (2000). Teaching tools teaching in the secondary school new York: Macmillan publishing co. Inc

Oser, F., and Baeriswyl, F. (2001). Choreographies of teachings. Bridging Instruction to Learning. In V.Richardson (Ed.), Choreographies of teachings. Bridging Instruktion to Learning (4th ed., pp. 1031-1085). Washington: American Educational Research Association.

Osuala, E.C. (2010). Introduction to research methodology, Onitsha: African Publishers Ltd.

Oyinloye, G. O. (2010). Primary school teachers’ perception of classroom management and its influence on pupils’ activities.

Ozioko, R., Ezeani, C. and Omeje, E. (2009), ICT Competencies and Library and Information Education for Knowledge Societies. National Association of Library and Information Science Educators (NALISE). Abstract of papers presented at the 14th National Conference held at University of Nigeria, Nsukka 2nd – 5th June, 2009.

Paine, S.C., Radicci, J., Rosellini, L. C., Deutchman, L. and Darch, C. B. (2003). Structuring your classroom for academic success. Champaign, IL: Research Press.

Panasuk, R., and Todd, J. (2005). Effectiveness of Lesson Planning: Factor Analysis. Journal of Instructional Psychology, 32(3), 215-233

Perry, P. (2004). Defi ning and Measuring the Quality of Teaching. In Green, D. (Ed). What is Quality in Higher Education? Bristol: SRHE and Open University Press.

Piller Bonne and Skilling M. 50 (2000). English Language Teaching Strategies used (unpublished research).

Postholm, M. B., Petterson, T., Flem, A. and Gudmundstottir, S. (2002). The Teacher’s Role when Pupils Use ICT as a Mediating Artefact in Project Work. <http://www.psy.vu.nl/iscrat2002/postholm.pdf>

Postholm, M. B., Petterson, T., Flem, A. and Gudmundstottir, S. (2002). The Teacher’s Role when Pupils Use ICT as a Mediating Artefact in Project Work. <http://www.psy.vu.nl/iscrat2002/postholm.pdf>

Reid, K., Hopkins, D., and Holly, P. (1987). Towards the Effective School. Oxford: Basil Blackwell.

Sajjad, S (2011). Effective Teaching Methods at Higher Education Level, Unipublished  Research, Submitted to the University of Karach Pakstan

Salman, A. and Olasina, G,(2009). Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Competencies and LIS Education for Knowledege Societies. Being a paper presented at the 14th National Conference of NALISE held at Menakaya Hall, Institute of Education, University of Nigeria, Nsukka 2-5 June, 2009.

Scheerens, J. (2004). Conceptual framework for the development of the PISA 2009 context questionnaires and thematic reports. OECD, paper for the PISA Governing Board.

Shavelson, R. J. (2006). “Teachers Decision Making: The psychology of Teaching Methods” The seventy Fifth year book of National Society for the Study of Education, Part 1.

Shulman, L. S. (2006). Those who understand: Knowledge growth in teaching. Educational Researcher. 15(2), 4-14.

Sparks, G. M. (2013). `Synthesis of research on staff development for effective teaching’, Educational Leadership, Vol. 41, (3), 65–72.

Stones, E. (2006). An Introduction to Educational Psychology. Ibadan: Spectrum Books

Siebert, C.J. (2005). Promoting pre-service teacher’s success in classroom management by leveraging a local union’s resources: A professional development school initiative. Education.

Teo, R. and Wong, A. (2000), “Does Problem Based Learning Create A Better Student: A Reflection?,”Paper presented at the 2nd Asia Pacific Conference on Problem Based Learning: Education Across Disciplines, December 4-7, Singapore.

Tharp, R. G and Gallimore, R. (2008). Rousing Minds to Life. Teaching, Learning and Schooling in Social Context. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Thompson (2004). classroom teachers urgently need to know more about effective strategies for teaching English Learners, (Unpublished Paper) USA.

Tømte, C. (2013). Educating Teachers for the New Millennium? Teacher training, ICT and digital competence. Nordic Journal of Digital Literacy, 8(01–02), 74–88.

Udoukpong, B. E. (1989). Effectiveness of case-study teaching technique on students’ achievement in and attitudes to social Studies. Unpublished Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Ibadan

Wagner, M., Kutash, K., Duchnowski, A. J. Epstein M. H. and Surri W. C. (2005).  The Children and youth we serve: A national picture of the characteristics of students with emotional disturbances receiving special education.  Journals of Emotional and Behavioural Disorders, 13 (2), 79-96.

Wassermann, S. (2003). Getting down to cases: Learning to teach with case studies. New York: Teachers College Press.

Whitty, G. (2006). Professional Competences and Professional Characteristics: The Northern Ireland Approach to the Reform of Teacher Education. In Hustler, D. and McIntyre, D. (Eds). Developing Competent Teachers: Approaches to Professional Competence in Teacher Education. London: David Fulton Publishers.

Whitty, G. (2006). Professional Competences and Professional Characteristics: The Northern Ireland Approach to the Reform of Teacher Education. In Hustler, D. and McIntyre, D. (Eds). Developing Competent Teachers: Approaches to Professional Competence in Teacher Education. London: David Fulton Publishers.

Wilson, Floden and Ferrini-Mundy (2002). Teacher preparation research: An insider’s view from the outside. Journal of Teacher Education, 53(3), pp 190–204

Yu, H. and Davies, M. (2007). The Case for Curriculum Reform in Australia Information Management and LIS Education. Part 1: Technology and Digitization as Drivers. Information Research 12(4), 1-20.

CSN Team.

Join Over 500,000+ Readers Online Now!

Subscribe NOW to Latest GIST from CSN PORTAL in Your EMAIL ADDRESS

Copyright Warning: Contents on this website may not be republished, reproduced, redistributed either in whole or in part without due permission or acknowledgement. All contents are protected by DMCA.
The content on this site is posted with good intentions. If you own this content & believe your copyright was violated or infringed, make sure you contact us at [[email protected]] to file a complaint and actions will be taken immediately.

Comments are closed.