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Problem Solving Technique Utilization and Academic Performance of Student in Ini Local Government Area (PDF)

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Problem Solving Technique Utilization and Academic Performance of Student in Ini Local Government Area

ABSTRACT

This study examined problem-solving techniques utilization on the academic performance of students in secondary schools in Ini Local Government Area.

Two research hypothesis were formulated to guide the study. The quasi-experimental research design was adopted for the study.

Random sampling was used to select 80 students from four intact class of JSS2 mathematics students which form the sample size of this study. The instrument used for data collection was the Mathematics Achievement Test (MAT).

Data collected were analysed using the independent t-test statistical tool. Findings revealed that there was a significant difference between students taught mathematics using problem solving techniques and lecture method.

Based on the findings, it was recommended among others that teachers should be encouraged and enlightened on the need to use problem-solving techniques in the teaching/learning of mathematics.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Certification        –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       i

Declaration        –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       ii

Acknowledgement      –       –       –       –       –       –       –       iii

Abstract     –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       iv

Table of Contents       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       v 

CHAPTER ONE: INTRODUCTION

1.1    Background of the Study     –       –       –       –       –       1

1.2    Statement of the Problem    –       –       –       –       –       2

1.3    Purpose of the Study  –       –       –       –       –       –       4

1.4    Significant of the Study               –       –       –       –       –       4

1.5    Research Questions    –       –       –       –       –       –       5

1.6    Research Hypothesis           –       –       –       –       –       5

1.7    Limitation of the Study –       –       –       –       –       –       6

1.8    Delimitation        –       –       –       –       –       –       –       7

1.9    Definition of Terms     –       –       –       –       –       –       7 

CHAPTER TWO: REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

2.1    Strategies for Problem Solving in Teaching and Learning

of Mathematics           –       –       –       –       –       –       8

2.2    Importance of Problem Solving    –       –       –       –       12

2.3    George Polya’s Problem Solving Techniques   –              –       21 

CHAPTER THREE:

3.0    Research Methodology        –       –       –       –       –       –       25

3.1    Research Design –       –       –       –       –       –       –       25

3.2    Area of the Study       –       –       –       –       –       –       25

3.3    Population of the Study       –       –       –       –       –       26

3.4    Sample Techniques and Sample Size    –       –       –       27

3.5    Instrumentation  –       –       –       –       –       –       –       27

3.6    Validation of the Instrument         –       –       –       –       27

3.7    Scoring of the Instrument    –       –       –       –       –       27

3.8    Administration of the Instrument  –       –       –       –       27

3.9    Method of Data Analysis      –       –       –       –       –       28

CHAPTER FOUR: DATA ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION OF FINDINGS

4.1    Data Analysis     –       –       –       –       –       –       –       29

4.2    Discussion of Findings –       –       –       –       –       –       31

CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY, RECOMMENDATIONS AND CONCLUSION

5.1    Summary   –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       33

5.2    Recommendations      –       –       –       –       –       –       34

5.3    Conclusion –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       35

REFERENCES     –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       37

APPENDIX I       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       38

APPENDIX II      –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       39

APPENDIX III     –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       46

APPENDIX IV     –       –       –       –       –       –       –       –       47


INTRODUCTION

In Nigeria, mathematics is a powerful tool in achieving the millennium development goals.

The millennium development goals was adopted in the United Nations Headquarters in the year 2000, with Nigeria as a signatory.

The goals comprised of eight major issues including the achievement of the “Universal Basic Education”.

Badmus (2013) opined that a universal basic education for all children is not a luxury but absolute necessity.

The role of mathematics in achieving this goals cannot be over emphasized. (Ukeje 2010) describe mathematics as stemming from the fact that “without mathematics there is no modern society”.

There effect of modern science to a nation makes it compelling that a developing nation like ours should give priority attention to the educational and utilizational qualities derivable from practical problem solving and intensive teaching of mathematics for all citizens”.

However, merely telling is not teaching and simply listening is not learning. Again some learning processes revolves around the teacher, where the students are only passive information receivers. Learning should be student centred, whereby the teacher is a more facilitator or guide. This is the focal point of modern system education. In all active learning processes, the student’s learn according to their own needs and pace (Orhan and Ruhan 2013).

They are given opportunities to make decisions regarding various dimensions of the learning process and to perform self-regulation learning abilities.


REFERENCES

Bohan, H., Irby, B., and Vogel, D., (1995). Problem solving: Dealing with data in elementary school. Teaching ChildrenMathematics 1(5), pp:256-260.

Cockcroft, W.H. (Ed.) (1982). Mathematics Counts. Report of the Committee of Inquiry into the Teaching of Mathematics in Schools, London: Her Majesty’s Stationery Office.

Gardner, Howard (1985). Frames of Mind. N.Y: Basic Books.

http://learningdisabilities.about.com/od/instructionalmaterials/ht/sqrqcq.htm (02.03.2008)

http://library.thinkquest.org/25459/learning/problem/ (15.04.2008)

http://www.nzmaths.co.nz/ps/Info/WhatIsPS.aspx-(17.04.2008)

Polya, G.(1973). How to Solve It-A New Aspect of Mathematical Method, Second Edition, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

Polya, G., (1980). ‘On solving mathematical problems in high school’. In S. Krulik (Ed). Problem Solving in School Mathematics, pp:1-2. Reston, Virginia: NCTM.

Resnick, L.B., (1987). Learning in school and out, Educational Researcher, 16, pp:13-20.

Stanic, G. and Kilpatrick, J., (1989). Historical perspectives on problem solving in the mathematics curriculum. In R.I. Charles and E.A. Silver (Eds), The Teaching and Assessing of Mathematical Problem Solving, pp:1-22. USA: National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.

CSN Team

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