10 Difference Between This and These with Examples 2021 Update : Current School News

10 Difference Between This and These with Examples

Filed in Education by on April 20, 2021

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Difference Between This and These with Examples: A pronoun is a word that can function as a noun phrase when used by itself or refers either to the participants in the discourse or to someone or something when mentioned elsewhere in the discourse.

Difference Between This and These

There are different kinds of pronouns which include personal pronouns, interrogative pronouns, indefinite pronouns, possessive pronouns, reciprocal pronouns, relative pronouns, reflexive pronouns, intensive pronouns, and demonstrative pronouns.

Demonstrative pronouns are pronouns used to point to something specific within a sentence. These pronouns can indicate items in space or time, and they can be either singular or plural.

Demonstrative pronouns are usually used to describe animals, places, or things, however, they can be used to describe people when the person is identified.

Typical examples of a demonstrative pronoun include these, those, this, that, such.

10 Difference Between This and These with Examples

This and These

This’ is used to describe a singular countable noun and ‘these’ is a pronoun used for plural countable nouns. Countable nouns are simply nouns that can be counted so they definitely have a plural form to represent when the item is more than one. A non-countable noun, on the other hand, has no plural form.

Examples of “This” and “These” Pronoun

1. What does this house remind you of?

2. Is this what you mean?

3. I’ll post these letters on my way home.

4. This was my mother’s car.

5. This is where the movie ended.

6. These were the boys who broke the window.

7. These scissors cut well.

8. These flowers are beautiful, aren’t they?

9. I wonder if she’ll recognize me after all these years.

10. Aren’t these dogs hungry?

Notable distinctions between ‘This’ and ‘These’

1. The pronoun ‘this’ is used with singular and uncountable nouns

Example:

 Try to repeat this routine every morning and evening.

2. The pronoun ‘these’ is used with plural countable nouns

Example:

You can drive any one of these cars.

3. The Pronoun ‘this’ is with words describing time and dates

Example:

I’ll be coming over to your church this evening.

Johnny sounds pretty sad this afternoon.

Bina will be in Ghana this week.

4. Both “this” and “these” are used to point are things that are physically close to the speaker

Example:

Why are you on this shirt?

These aren’t the colors I requested for.

5. Both “this” and “these” are used when referring to things or ideas

Example:

Put the periwinkle and red meat on the gas cooker. Heat this over a low flame until it boils properly.

These weren’t our first encounter with the Romans.

6. The pronoun “this” is used when referring to people when we want to identify ourselves or others or to ask the identity of other speakers

Example:

Kingsley, this is my mother, Mrs. Mary.

This is my best friend, Joseph.

7. The pronoun ‘these’ is used while pointing to the object of contention

Example:

Do these belong to Joseph Brandon?

8. Both pronouns are used to identify emotional distance: Generally, we use ‘this’ and ‘these’ to refer to things that we feel positive about, that we are happy to be associated with

Example:

Isn’t this the lovely car your mum bought for you?

I love these new portraits on your wall.

9. “This” is used as a substitute for ‘a’ and ‘an’. In this case, ‘this’ is used to refer to something significant or recent, or to introduce something or someone new in a story.

Example:

This guy defrauded Ben and his sister.

This Man isn’t good at repairing electric cookers.

10. Both pronouns are used to replace determiners.

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