An Assessment of Built-Up Expansion in Usmanu Danfodiyo University : Current School News

An Assessment of Built-Up Expansion in Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto

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An Assessment of Built-Up Expansion in Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto.

ABSTRACT

This research project is an assessment of built-up expansion in Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto from 2007 to 2015. Data for this research project was collected from both primary and secondary sources. The primary source of data include field observation, interview and satellite imageries. While secondary data include relevant published materials such as textbooks, journal articles, dissertations, reports, and the internet.

The method used is satellite image processing, image classification, overlay operations, vectorisation and digitizing. The study revealed that built-up expansion is more towards the north-east and eastern part of the study area and to some extent in the central part.

From the result of analysis, it was discovered that in 2007, there are 208 structures covering 145,715 square meters. While in 2015, 50 structures were raised with an area of 92,328 square meters. The total built-up structures are 250 with a total area of 238,044 square meters. It is recommended that, the management should solicit for adequate funding in order to maintain and sustain the original master plan.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Title page ———— i
Declaration page —– ii
Certification page — iii
Dedication ———- iv
Acknowledgement —- v
Table of content —– vi
Abstract —- viii

CHAPTER ONE: BACKGROUND TO THE STUDY

1.0 Introduction—- 1
1.1 Statement of research problem —- 2
1.2 Aims and objectives —- 3
1.3 Research question ——- 5
1.4 Justification of the study — 5
1.5 Scope of the study —- 6
1.6 Significance of study —- 6
1.7 Study area ——– 7
1.7.1 Geographical location —— 7
1.7.2 Physical characteristics – 7
1.7.3 Climate —— 8
1.7.4 Population—- 9
1.8 Material and methods —— 10
1.8.1 Materials and software ——– 11
1.8.2 Types and source of data —– 11
1.8.3 Method of data analysis —– 12

CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURES REVIEW

2.0 Introduction —— 16
2.1 The implication of built-up expansion on ecological footprints — 16
2.2 The effect of built-up expansion on agriculture ——— 17
2.3 The impact of built-up expansion on population growth and socio-economic aspects 17
2.4 The effect of built-up expansion on the surface temperature of the earth — 18
2.5 The implication of built-up expansion on geomorphology —— 19
2.6 Environmental impact of urban expansion ———- 20
2.7 Health and environmental impact of urban expansion ———– 21
2.8 Environmental impact of urban expansion on biodiversity ——– 21
2.9 Usmanu danfodiyo university, sokoto master plan- 22
2.10 The land use plan of the usmanu danfodiyo university, sokoto — 23

CHAPTER THREE: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION

3.0 Introduction ——- 26
3.1 The trend and direction of built-up expansion — 26
3.2 The deviation of built-up in relation to the master plan — 31

CHAPTER FOUR: SUMMARY, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

4.0 Introduction—— 34
4.1 Summary —- 34
4.2 Conclusion ——— 35
4.3 Recommendations —— 35
References —- 36
List of tables- 37
List of figures —– 37

INTRODUCTION

Built-up means the built- up areas, while Expansion is a space through which anything is expanded (Advanced English Dictionary). Built-up areas have been expanding throughout the world. Monitoring and prediction of the built-up is not only important for the economic development but also acts as sentinels of environmental decline important for ecologically sustainable development of a region. (ARER, 2003).

In the year 2000, urban areas occupied only about 2% – 3% of the earth’s surface; However, they sheltered nearly half the world’s population. The rapid expansion of urban areas, is dramatically changing the landscape of the urban-rural fringe, clearly highlighting the intensity of the ecological footprints of cities. The ecological footprint is defined as “the total area of productive land and water required continuously to produce all the resources consumed and to assimilate all the wastes produced, by a defined population, wherever on earth that land is located”.

The wealthy quarter of the world’s population consume over three-quarters of world’s resources, and of the total global resource depletion and pollution, contribution from cities is probably 70% or more. (RWWMEIA, 1996). For example, the per capital ecological footprint of North Americans is 4-5 ha/capita, which accounts for three times their fair share of the Earth’s bounty. Similarly Japan’s footprint is about 2.5 ha/capita and the Netherland’s is 3.3 ha/capita, accounting for about eight and is times greater than the areas of total domestic territories respectively.

REFERENCES

Lambin, E.f.; Geist, H.J.; Lepers, E. Dynamics of Land-use and land cover change in tropical regions. Annu. Rev. Environ. Resour. 2003, 28, 205-241.
Douglas, I. Human Settlements. In change Land use and land cover-A Global perspective; W.B, Tuener, B.L., 11, Ed;, Cambridge University Press: New York, NY, USA, 1994: pp. 149-169.
Wintle, B.A.; j.; Potts, J.M. Fauna habitat Modeling and Mapping: A review and case study in The lower Hunter central Cost region of NNSW. Austral Ecol. 2005, 30,719-738.
“C-GIDD (Canback Global income Distribution Database)” Canback Dangel. Retrived 2008- 08-20.
Brueckner, J.K., and D. Fansler, 1983, “The Economics of Urban Sprawl: Theory and Evidence On the spatial sizes of cities”, Review of Economics and Statistics, 55, 479-82.

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