Ads! Gain 200 Level Admission to Study Any Course In Any University Of Your Choice Through IJMB/JUPEB. NO JAMB | LOW FEES. Registration In Progress. Call 07063900993 NOW!

The Use of Creativity and Deviation in Nigerian English: Implications for International Intelligibility and Acceptability

ADS! Download JAMB CBT Software Now for FREE!

The Use of Creativity and Deviation in Nigerian English: Implications for International Intelligibility and Acceptability.

ABSTRACT

This study investigates the use of creativity and deviation in Nigerian English, and the implications it has for international intelligibility and acceptability.

It examines these deviation and creative forms in sounds, lexemes, syntactic forms, semantic forms used in Nigerian English in comparison with similar forms as used in Standard British English. The study reclined on interlanguage and languages-in-contact theories as the basis for the investigation.

Data for the study were gathered basically from existing literature on both Nigerian English and Standard British English. At each level and/or sub-level of linguistic organization, 5 to 10 items were selected from each of Nigerian English and Standard British English.

Adopting Standard British English as control; these items in the Nigerian variety of English were analyzed and compared with those in Standard British English, and the areas of divergence noted.

Findings of the study indicate that at all the levels of linguistic organization; significant deviation exists in Nigerian English from Standard British English.

Findings also show that the peculiar features of sound and syntax, and the nativized words and expressions used in Nigerian English are perfectly understood and acceptable in the Nigerians sociolinguistic setting but are not readily understood by the native speakers of English, due to differences in context, worldview and culture.

The research thus affirms that Nigerian English is a legitimate variety in its own right.

It further concludes that although international intelligibility and acceptability are important so as to establish a standard local norm, local considerations take pre- eminence over international considerations. The study encourages intensive development of literature on Nigerian English.

With this and familiarity, L1 speakers of English and other visitors will get accommodated in this variety of English just as Nigerians who visit other English speaking countries do with British English, American English and other varieties where usages also differ. By so doing, communication will be facilitated.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CONTENTS PAGES
Title Page – – – – – – – – – i
Approval Page – – – – – – – – ii
Certification – – – – – – – – – iii
Dedication – – – – – – – – – iv
Acknowledgement – – – – – – – – v
Abstract – – – – – – – – – vii
List of Tables – – – – – – – – – viii
List of Charts – – – – – – – – – ix
List of Abbreviations – – – – – – – – x
Table of contents

Chapter One: Introduction

1.1 Background of the Study – – – – – – – 1
1.2 Statement of the Problem – – – – – – – 6
1.3 Objective of the Study – – – – – – – 6
1.4 Significance of the Study – – – – – – – 7
1.5 Scope /Delimitation – – – – – – – – 7
1.6 Definition of Terms – – – – – – – – 8

Chapter Two: Review of Related Literature

2.1 Nigerian Spoken English and its Varieties – – – – – 10
2.2 Written Nigerian English and its Varieties – – – – – 16
2.3 Nativization – – – – – – – – – 20
2.4 The Concept of New Englishes – – – – – – 24
2.5 English and International Intelligibility – – – – – 29
2.6 The Issue of Acceptability in Language – – – – – 42
2.7 Summary of Literature Review – – – – – – 45

Chapter Three: Methodology and Theoretical Framework

3.1 Methodology – – – – – – – – 48
3.1.1 Method of Data Collection – – – – – – 48
3.1.2 Method of Data Analysis – – – – – – – 49
3.2 Theoretical Framework – – – – – – 49
3.2.1 Interlanguage – – – – – – – – 49
3.2.2 Language-in-Contact Theory – – – – – – 52

Chapter Four: Nigerian English Vis-à-vis Standard British English

4.1 The Issue of Standard in the English Language – – – – 55
4.2 Differences between Nigerian English and Standard British English – 58
4.2.1 Phonological Differences – – – – – – – 58
4.2.2 Lexical Differences/Neologisms – – – – – – 66
4.2.3 Syntactic Differences – – – – – – – 69
4.2.4 Semantic Differences – – – – – – – 73
4.2.5 Pragmatic Differences and other Innovations – – – – 82
4.3 Implications of the Differences on International Intelligibility and
Acceptability – – – – – – – – – 83

Chapter Five: Summary, Conclusion, Recommendations and Suggestions

for Further Study
5.1 Summary – – – – – – – – – 86
5.2 Conclusion – – – – – – – – – 90
5.3 Recommendations – – – – – – – – 93
5.4 Suggestions for Further Research – – – – – 94
References – – – – – – – – – 95

INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background to the Study

English is one of the most widely used and spoken languages in the world today. Ferguson in his Foreword to Braj Kachru points out that, ‘… there has never been a single language which spread … over most of the world, as English has done in this century’ (Kachru, ix).

According to Charles Barber, English is spoken by well over four hundred million native speakers and roughly about the same member of people speak it as a second language (236).

It is also generally said to be a world language because it has spread to other continents of the world through trade, colonization and conquest.

In Nigeria, for instance, English is spoken as a second language. It was first introduced to Nigerians during the middle of the 16th century when the British came to Nigeria for purposes of exploration, trade, and colonization.

Before English was introduced to Nigerians, Nigerians had had their native languages, which they used to satisfy their linguistic needs.

The introduction and use of English created a contact situation, that is, a situation where two or more languages are used alternatively by an individual.

REFERENCES

Achebe, Chinua. Morning Yet on Creation Day. Ibadan: Heinemann, 1975. Print Adebunkunola, Abiodun. Introduction to English Language. Abeokuta: Finetone Finess,Print

Adegbija, Efurosebina. “The Domestication of English in Nigeria”. Segun Awonusi, and Babalola, E. A. (Eds) The Domestication of English in Nigeria. Lagos: University of Lagos Press, 2004: 20-44. Print

Adekunle, Michael. “Non-Random Variation in the Nigerian English”. Varieties and Functions of English in Nigeria. Ibadan: African University Press, 1979: 41-42.

Adesanoye, Festus. “A Study of Varieties of Written English in Nigeria”. Unpublished Ph.D Thesis, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, 1973.

Adetugbo, Abiodun. Nigerian English. Fact or Fiction? Lagos Notes and Records 6, 1977:128-141. Print

Enter your email address:

Delivered by TMLT NIGERIA

Join Over 3,500 000+ Readers Online Now!


=> FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM | FACEBOOK & TWITTER FOR LATEST UPDATES

ADS: KNOCK-OFF DIABETES IN JUST 60 DAYS! - ORDER YOURS HERE

COPYRIGHT WARNING! Contents on this website may not be republished, reproduced, redistributed either in whole or in part without due permission or acknowledgement. All contents are protected by DMCA.
The content on this site is posted with good intentions. If you own this content & believe your copyright was violated or infringed, make sure you contact us at [[email protected]] to file a complaint and actions will be taken immediately.

Tags: , , ,

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: